Conway is dedicated to working with communities in the face of climate change and other major challenges. Real projects for real clients form the core of Conway’s intensive ten-month curriculum. In the fall, each student is assigned an individual project for a residential or small
municipal site. Teams in the winter tackle larger land planning projects at a regional or town-wide scale. The spring’s team projects focus on an intermediate and more detailed community scale. Below are the projects students completed for community clients in 2013-2014:

ASHUELOT GREENSPACE LANDSCAPE PLAN
KEENE, NEW HAMPSHIRE | WINTER 2014 + SPRING 2014

WINTER STUDENT TEAM: Gallagher Hannan, Allison Ruschp
SPRING STUDENT TEAM: Michele Carlson, Gallagher Hannan
CLIENTS: JRR Properties, LLC
IN BRIEF: Transformation of an abandoned 3.5-acre parking lot into a riverfront greenspace and recreation hub, flexible community event space, natural playground, and functioning riparian zone.

BRATTLEBORO AREA JEWISH COMMUNITY LANDSCAPE PLAN
WEST BRATTLEBORO, VERMONT | FALL 2013
CLIENTS: Brattleboro Area Jewish Community
STUDENT DESIGNER: Brandon Tennis
IN BRIEF: A nature preserve that maximizes the feeling of prospect and refuge, establishes multiple outdoor rooms, and provides the congregation with passage across steep slopes to previously inaccessible land.

FOOD IN THE CITY
SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS | WINTER 2014
CLIENTS: Springfield Food Policy Council Urban Agricultural Committee
STUDENT TEAM: Emily Berg, Abigail Elwood, Marie Macchiarolo
IN BRIEF: A Geographic Information Systems-based process developed by the student team for Springfield is used to evaluate the suitability of land for community gardens, farms, and orchards. The process offers a model for other urban agriculture plans.

GREEN STREETS GUIDEBOOK
HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS | WINTER 2014
CLIENTS: City of Holyoke
STUDENT TEAM: Michele Carlson, Willa Caughey, Nelle Ward
IN BRIEF: The Green Streets Guidebook is intended to help policymakers and developers create healthier, more vibrant streetscapes. The document includes a toolbox with recommended green infrastructure, complete streets, and placemaking strategies; a set of design templates representative of a variety of Holyoke’s street characteristics that can be applied to and modified for future projects; a site-specific application of Green Street design principles to a likely redevelopment area downtown; an exploration of relative costs and benefits; and recommended next steps for implementation.

IRELAND CEMETERY LANDSCAPE PLAN
CHESTERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS | FALL 2013
CLIENTS: Ireland Street Cemetery
STUDENT DESIGNER: Michele Carlson
IN BRIEF: Cemetery trustees decided to expand this small, historic cemetery to include a dedicated green burial area. This landscape design incorporates low-maintenance
native plantings, paths, and seating for pedestrians, and access for maintenance vehicles.

JUST ROOTS LANDSCAPE PLAN
GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS | FALL 2013
CLIENTS: Just Roots at the Greenfield Community Farm
STUDENT DESIGNER: Marie Macchiarolo
IN BRIEF: A design for this community farm models a beneficial relationship between agriculture and land conservation by protecting priority habitats with the re-routing of trails, improving pedestrian safety, providing a space for community members to connect, and producing energy on site.

LEAD MILLS CONSERVATION AREA DESIGN
MARBLEHEAD AND SALEM, MASSACHUSETTS | SPRING 2014

CLIENTS: Town of Marblehead and City of Salem
STUDENT TEAM: Emily Berg, Jeffery Dawson, Allison Ruschp
IN BRIEF: The Chadwick Lead Mills Conservation Area was once home to mills that contaminated the soils on site with large amounts of lead. Following a series of remediation efforts to stabilize the soils, the two communities sought design alternatives to support a range of potential passive recreational activities, and connect the property to nearby conservation land and the Salem–Marblehead bike trail. The student team proposed a site design that includes a universally accessible loop trail and diverse native meadow and grass species.

LEICESTER OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION PLAN UPDATE
LEICESTER, MASSACHUSETTS | WINTER 2014
CLIENTS: Town of Leicester
STUDENT TEAM: Teodoro Senni, Brandon Tennis
IN BRIEF: This update to the town’s open space and recreation plan focuses on new strategies for conservation and public land management in the “new normal” of today’s economic climate.

LISTENING TO THE LANDSCAPE
SHERBORN, MASSACHUSETTS | SPRING 2014
CLIENTS: Sherborn Conservation Commission and Land Management Task Force
STUDENT TEAM: Emily Davis, Brandon Tennis
IN BRIEF: Natural gas pipelines, an industrial railroad, and electricity transmission lines all dissect and fragment the Barber Reservation, a 200-acre, town-owned forest in Sherborn,
Massachusetts. A land management plan by Emily Davis and Brandon Tennis identifies
important ecosystem services provided by the property and gives recommendations on how
those ecological services can be improved, while also accommodating the need for passive
recreation and periodic disturbance by utility companies.

MARLBORO COLLEGE CAMPUS CORE REDESIGN
MARLBORO, VERMONT | SPRING 2014
CLIENTS: Marlboro College
STUDENT TEAM: Abigail Elwood, Nelle Ward
IN BRIEF: A redesign of the college’s car-centric campus core consolidates and decentralizes vehicular use and access, creates a more inviting landscape for pedestrians, and slows stormwater runoff with a series of terraces and retaining walls.

MOUNT CEMETERY LANDSCAPE PLAN
CHESTERFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS | FALL 2013
CLIENTS: Town of Chesterfield
STUDENT DESIGNER: Trevor Buckley
IN BRIEF: This landscape plan integrates historic and proposed new green burial areas, as it enhances the property with gardens for contemplation that include native plant communities. The plan set includes a study of soil contamination issues associated with cemetery design and burial practices.

A PLACEMAKING IDEABOOK FOR HOLYOKE’S INNOVATION DISTRICT
HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS | WINTER 2014
CLIENTS: Pioneer Valley Planning Commission, City of Holyoke’s Office of Planning and Economic Development
STUDENT TEAM: Emily Davis, Jeffrey Dawson, Elizabeth Kelly
IN BRIEF: In their placemaking ideabook for Holyoke, Emily Davis, Jeffrey Dawson, and Elizabeth Kelly make the case that the model of ecological succession has a great deal in common with the development of urban spaces through time. Disturbances on various scales, such as the forest fire shown below, make for opportunities that create a dynamic equilibrium. Building on successful examples from other cities and on existing projects in Holyoke, the report recommends various strategies, at multiple scales and time-frames, to help create dynamic public spaces.

SUITABILITY STUDY FOR PROPOSED AFFORDABLE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT
SOUTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS | FALL 2013
CLIENTS: Pioneer Valley Habitat for Humanity
STUDENT DESIGNER: Gallagher Hannan
IN BRIEF: Southampton, Massachusetts, needs more affordable housing to comply with Massachusetts Law 40B, and is assessing different town-owned sites for their suitability. The focus of this study was a six-acre lot separated from the road by steep slopes of over 30 percent and an intermittent stream. The project involved siting several possible access roads and researching the appropriateness of cluster housing for this development.

A SUSTAINABLE REVIVAL
PALO, LEYTE, PHILIPPINES | SPRING 2014
CLIENTS: Kusog Tacloban
STUDENT TEAM: Trevor Buckley, Marie Macchiarolo
IN BRIEF: An exploratory report prepared for the non-profit organization Kusog Tacloban by Trevor Buckley and Marie Macchiarolo proposes a process and strategy for developing regional environmental standards and a neighborhood toolkit for “building back better” in Leyte Province, Philippines, after the devastation of Super Typhoon Yolanda in November 2013.

VALLEY RAILROAD STATE PARK SCENIC CORRIDOR STUDY
ESSEX, CONNECTICUT | WINTER 2014
CLIENTS: Lower Connecticut River Valley Council of Governments (RiverCOG)
STUDENT TEAM: Trevor Buckley, Christian Johnson
IN BRIEF: This report analyzes the regional context and existing conditions along the corridor, and provides several conceptual designs and design guidelines for developing a trail, including one that could replace the existing rail and another that could be built along the rail. This study examines the potential for a multiuse trail along the northern nine miles of the Valley Railroad corridor in south central Connecticut. The study is one of several to be commissioned by the RiverCOG that will examine the Connecticut Valley Railroad State Park’s role as a regional asset and how it factors into regional planning efforts related to transportation, conservation, and economic development.