When commercial use of drones becomes legal in the United States, one person who will be ready to fly these unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for peaceful applications, such as planning, design, and natural resource monitoring, will be John Hanning ’82.

John Hanning (at left in photo) is the CEO of Archimedes Aerospace LLC, which conducts NASA-funded research with unmanned aerial vehicles on agricultural and ocean science topics.

John Hanning (at left in photo) is the CEO of Archimedes Aerospace LLC, which conducts NASA-funded research with unmanned aerial vehicles on agricultural and ocean science topics.

“I have found the unique aerial perspective that drones provide can be useful for all phases of developing a project. From initial site analysis through post-construction documentation, drones can capture actual site conditions on private property in real time, without being hindered by cloud cover, terrain or scheduling restrictions. Also, drone video has an immediacy and user accessibility that cannot be matched by computer graphics simulation or conventional aerial photography.”

The image below is of Brown’s Trace River in Vermont. John explains, “The riverside oblique angle was shot using a nadir view GoPro3 camera at about 350 feet above ground level at a 30 degree bank angle of the fixed wing airframe. Aerial obliques are a good way to show the depth of stream buffer vegetation.”

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